Trump and the nuclear ‘football’: No President Should Have the Authority to Launch Nuclear Weapons

By Dave Lindorff

            Maybe having a president in the White House who acts like an impulsive child is a good thing — at least if it convinces the Senate, a body that has for decades surrendered its vital Constitutional power over war and peace to the Executive Branch, to wrest it back.

            This is particularly important in the case of nuclear weapons. As things stand, going back all the way to Harry Truman, the only read more

Doping troops to keep them in combat: The Military’s Drugging Problem

Most Americans probably assume that any soldier hit by a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG)—peppered with metal fragments, brain bruised by the shockwave from the explosion, and suffering multiple ruptured discs in the neck and spine—would be whisked from the battlefield to a hospital somewhere in Europe or the U.S., treated, and cashiered out of the military with a Purple Heart.

Staff Sgt. Chas Jacquier learned what really happens, though. When an RPG landed next to him in Afghanistan in 2005, read more

From Salon.com magazine: The Attack on ‘Fake News’ is Really an Attack on Alternative Media

By Dave Lindorff

These are tough days to be a serious journalist. Report a story now, with your facts all lined up nicely, and you’re still likely to have it labeled “fake news” by anyone whose ox you’ve gored — and even by friends who don’t share your political perspective. For good measure, they’ll say you’ve based it on “alternative facts.”

Historians say the term “fake news” dates from the late 19th-century era of “yellow journalism,” but read more

Whose crime killed more soldiers: Dubya’s or Bergdahl’s?: ‘I Made a Horrible Mistake’

By John Grant

I’m admitting I made a horrible mistake.
– Bo Bergdahl’s testimony in his court martial

Charging a man with murder in Vietnam is like charging someone for speeding at the Indianapolis 500.
– From Apocalypse Now

Obviously, to ask who endangered soldiers more, President Bush or Bo Bergdahl, is a rhetorical question. The real issue is whether a Dishonorable Discharge, a demotion and a fine is enough punishment for Bo Bergdahl. read more

A simple human story in tumultuous times: Hollywood, War Trauma and the Rule of Money

By John Grant

read more

Jason Hall, the screenwriter who wrote the script for the Clint Eastwood blockbuster American Sniper, a well-made piece of hagiographic cinema based on a memoir by Chris Kyle, has made what feels like a corrective on the subject. This time, he’s both writer and director of a film that reportedly was initially slated to be directed by Hollywood giant Stephen Spielberg, with Hall read more

Democrats Were Fighting for the Rich in Opposing the GOP’s 401(k) Cut Proposal

By Dave Lindorff

If you want to understand why the Democratic Party lost to Trump and the Republicans in 2016, why they’ll probably fail to take back Congress in 2018, and why they’ll probably lose big in the next presidential election in 2020, just look at their obscene stand on the GOP’s proposal to slash the taxable employee deduction for contributions to 401(k) plans from the current $18,000 to just $2500.

Of course the GOP proposal read more

50 years ago this month: A contemporary account of the 1967 March on the Pentagon

By Dave Lindorff (as an 18-year-old anti-war protester)   …            As the march moved towards the Pentagon, I was surprised and relieved to see virtually no signs of harassment, of which there was a lot at the New York march, from bystanders and from the police.  There was a rather gay feeling through the march as the day got warmer.

 

            We got across the Potomac and the Pentagon came into view. People were there already. The march began to move faster, and soon we were on the Pentagon grounds.

 

            When we got to the North Parking Lot, the buses were already there to take us home, but many people were moving off towards the mall of the Pentagon —a sort of enormous front porch. read more

Gen. Kelly needs to zip it: America’s Heroes also Work in Firehouses, Hospitals and Schools

This past weekend, my wife and I drove up to Connecticut to attend my 50th high school reunion (which was a great event). But on the way there, we stopped off at a local B&B to drop off our luggage since we’d booked the place for that night. While we were standing just outside the open entryway of the 250-year-old house talking with the innkeeper, there was a loud explosion and a blast of air. It turned out there had been a gas explosion in the inn’s kitchen which, while it didn’t ignite read more

Their action even today saves us from Trump using nukes: Two Soviet spies who deserve a Nobel Peace Prize

By Dave Lindorff

            It becomes increasingly clear that two Soviet spies, Klaus Fuchs and Theodore Hall, should receive posthumous Nobel Peace Prizes.

            Had these two idealistic young men, both brilliant scientists working on the Manhattan Project that developed the atomic bomb during World War II, not provided crucial information about the secret US/British project to develop the atomic bomb, and read more

Corbyn Defied Media Rules by Linking UK Wars and Military Sales to Terrorism

This article by DAVE LINDORFF was published first by Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR) at FAIR.org

When a terrorist killed 22 at a May 22 concert filled with young people in England’s Manchester, most journalists—especially US ones—assumed it would help the struggling Conservative Party and its standard-bearer, Prime Minister Theresa May, win the snap election she had called for June 8, just 17 days ahead.

That is, after all, the conventional wisdom: In times of crisis, like a terror read more