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Just wondering... Is Naomi Wolf Working for the NSA?

By Dave Lindorff


I hate to do this, but I feel obligated to share, as the story unfolds, my creeping concern that the writer Naomi Wolf is not whom she purports to be, and that her motive in writing an article on her public Facebook page speculating about whether National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden might actually be still working for the NSA, could be to support the government’s effort to destroy him.


The United States and Palestine: Business as Usual

                A report on June 11, 2013 from Reuters calls Richard Falk, the United Nations human rights investigator for Palestine, ‘embattled’, apparently because he has once again refused to dance to the U.S.-Israel tune.  At a forum of the U.N. Human Rights Council, he called for an inquiry into what he sees as the torture of Palestinians in Israeli custody. The U.S., of course, with its own shocking record of torturing its political prisoners in Guantanamo, Iraq, and who knows where else, boycotted the debate. Israel did the same, accusing the forum of anti-Israel bias.

Healing a Culture of Torture

You’re invited to mark Torture Awareness Month.

Healing a Culture of Torture - 6/25/2013

Lutheran Church of the Reformation - 212 E. Capitol St.

Washington DC  20003

Reception: 6:30 pm Presentation: 7:00 - 9:00 pm

Featured Speaker:

Juan Mendez, the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture

Panel Responders:

Can We Know What Torture Is?

REVIEWS: ZERO DARK THIRTY (Movie)

by Karen Malpede

http://www.humanrights.asia/news/ahrc-news/AHRC-STM-100-2013

TORTURE: ASIAN AND GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES | FEB-APR 2013 VOLUME 02 NUMBER 01

‘Zero Dark Thirty’. Director, Kathryn Bigelow. Screenwriter, Mark Boal. Sony Pictures, December 2012; & ‘Shadow Lives: The Forgotten Women of the War on Terror’. By, Victoria Brittain. Pluto Press, February 2013.

Whenever the long arm of state-sponsored violence reaches into the lives of ordinary people, the artist, the writer, face choices, moral and esthetic. They can look away. Most do so, turning attention strictly to domestic or historical matters. Or, like film director Kathryn Bigelow and screenwriter Mark Boal, they can take the story power tells and retell it as it has been told to them, in this case by the CIA, which provided the filmmakers special access to the archives on the hunt for, and slaying of, Usama bin Laden.

A few, however, will refuse to become complicit in the narratives of power and will try to speak the true cost of violence. In a series of newspaper articles, two verbatim plays, a co-authored memoir of Guantanamo detainee, Moazzem Begg, and culminating, now, in Shadow Lives: The Forgotten Women of the War on Terror, journalist Victoria Brittain has consistently brought to public view the lives of those deemed ‘other’, devout Muslims persecuted by the US and the UK in the so-called Global War on Terror. She has made connection with state-power’s victims, and, through her writing, created a sense of justice where justice fails to exist. This, then, is a tale of two diametrically opposed politically motivated esthetics: Brittain’s series of nonfiction portraits and Bigelow and Boal’s Hollywood film, Zero Dark Thirty, alternately described by them as fact or fiction.

Making the hero pay: A Nation’s Betrayal

By Dan DeWalt


This week, the government began their assault against private Bradley Manning. Even though he has already plead guilty to misusing classified documents and faces twenty years in prison, prosecutors want him branded as having aided the enemy, with a life sentence to go along.

You Have the Right to Remain Silent...as the Grave: Is the FBI in the Execution Business?

By Dave Lindorff


Anyone who was a fan of the old ABC TV series “The Untouchables” or of the later series, also on ABC, called “The FBI,” would know something is terribly fishy about the FBI slaying of Ibragim Todashev.


Congress Today: Who Does it Really Represent?

With U.S. approval of Congress holding steady at a whopping 15%, one wonders just who it is the elected representatives are representing. Perhaps we can answer that question, by looking at some of their recent activities, and considering some of the things currently left undone.

Small Miracle: Guantanamo Dissected at House Briefing, May 10

The Deepening Shame of Guantanamo

May 13, 2013

Editor Note: For more than a decade, the Guantanamo Bay prison has been a blot on America’s conscience. President Obama vowed to close it but acceded to congressional demands to keep it open. Now, an emerging humanitarian crisis – a mass hunger strike – is drawing only scant attention.

By Ray McGovern

There have been nine congressional hearings on the Benghazi controversy – with more to come – but almost no one in Congress dares put the spotlight on the unfolding scandal surrounding the Guantanamo Bay prison where most of the remaining 166 inmates have opted to “escape” from indefinite detention via the only way open to them – starving themselves to death.

Boston offers grim preview of coming attractions: Police State on Display

 

By Dave Lindorff


The Boston Marathon bombing has already demonstrated the best and the worst of America for all the world to see.


Guantanamo Hunger Strike Passes 60 Days

Protest Actions Demand End to Indefinite Detention, Closure of Prison 

What:    Rallies, Protests, Visual Photo-ops

Where: 16 U.S. Cities including SF Bay Area (more to be announced)

When:   Thursday April 11, 2013


San Francisco protest:

4:30 PM rally NEW Federal Building, San Francisco (7th/Mission);

“Prisoners’ Processional” march to Powell/Market

5:30 vigil at Powell/Market

Across the U.S. on Thursday, street protests will support prisoners detained at the U.S. prison in Guantánamo who are engaged in a large-scale hunger strike which began in early February. Some prisoners are now in critical condition. 

“The vast majority of the 166 men have been held for more than eleven years without any charge or fair trial, with no end to their detention in sight. The Obama administration must take swift measures to humanely address the immediate causes of the hunger strike and fulfill its promise to close Guantánamo” says a statement from World Can’t Wait andWitness Against Torture.

The prisoners’ action, described by a U.S. military spokesman as an “orchestrated event intended to garner media attention,” has begun to achieve “just that, and we intend to magnify their voices,” say the protesters.  The Boston Globehas urged President Obama to close the prison because keeping Guantánamo open is “a challenge to our reputation around the world.”  The New York Times said the prisoners’ action is “exposing the lawlessness of the system that marooned them there,” describing the indefinite detention of men long cleared for release as the “essence of what has been wrong with Guantánamo from the start.”

Protesters demand that action be taken by the U.S. government in time to save the lives of the prisoners, with the aim of closing the prison.  In Chicago and San Francisco, nine protesters will wear orange jumpsuits to represent the nine men who have already died in Guantánamo waiting for justice.  

At noon in Washington, D.C. protesters will gather at the White House to focus on the president’s 2009 promise to close Guantánamo.  

Full information on the protests nationwide.

Journalistic Malpractice at the Post and the Times Rejecting the Offer of Evidence of US War Crimes

 

 By Dave Lindorff


Thanks to the courageous action of Private Bradley Manning, the young soldier who has been held for over two years by the US military on trumped-up charges including espionage and aiding the enemy, we now have solid evidence that the country’s two leading news organizations, the Washington Post and the New York Times, are not interesting in serious reporting critical of the government.

Denouncing Torture and "Zero Dark Thirty" in Hollywood

Debra Sweet, Director, The World Can't Wait                          It happened on The Hollywood Walk of Shame. World Can't Wait joined with ICUJP and other groups in a march and vigil that took over the intersection at Hollywood Blvd. and Highland Ave for about 45 minutes on Sunday, Feb 17. This is the famous scene where Oscars will be awarded in one week. Actor David Clennon spoke at a nearby church and then led the group of about 40 people, all ages, down to the Avenue of the Stars. 

Yale University to Train U.S. Special Forces in Interrogation Techniques by Practicing on Immigrants

The Department of Defense and Yale University have partnered up to train U.S. soldiers in the art of interrogation techniques with the local immigrant community acting as test subjects, reports the Yale Daily News.

As early as this April, Yale plans to welcome a training center for interrogators to its campus.

Who’s going to step up? President Obama Must be Impeached

 

By Dave Lindorff


If the Constitution is to have any relevance, and if America is to remain a free society, then there is really no alternative: there must be a bill of impeachment drawn up and submitted in the House, and there must at least be a hearing on that bill in the House Judiciary Committee.


British man who 'vanished' after being stripped of citizenship says he was tortured and forced to sign a confession by the CIA

Daily Mail:

A British man who disappeared after being stripped of his citizenship claims he was tortured in an African prison before being handed over to the CIA and forced to sign a confession.

Mahdi Hashi, who vanished last summer in Somalia, has described for the first time his 'horrific' ordeal at the hands of the secret police in the neighbouring state of Djibouti, who he claims worked closely with US interrogators.

The 23-year-old, who lived in London, alleges that he was stripped and repeatedly slapped before being threatened with electrocution and sexual abuse by officers who were attached to Djibouti's intelligence service.

Speaking from a top security prison in New York, where his family tracked him down just before Christmas, Mr Hashi claims he was so frightened by the threats of torture that he signed the confession demanded by his American interrogators.

In a 35-minute conversation with his British lawyers last week, Mr Hashi also told how he was made to watch as a Swedish detainee was beaten in front of him: '[The man was] stripped to his underwear and hung upside down.

Bahraini princess facing multiple torture charges

Does every American girl who'd like to be a princess know what that means?

BBC:

A Bahraini princess is facing charges of torturing pro-democracy activists in the Gulf island kingdom.

Noura Bint Ebrahim al-Khalifa, who serves in Bahrain's Drugs Control Unit, is accused along with another officer of torturing three people in detention.

Hundreds of protesters were detained as Bahrain struggled to put down a popular uprising that began in February 2011.

The uprising, which began peacefully with calls for democratic reform, was crushed by the ruling al-Khalifas.

Noura al-Khalifa, 29, who denies the charges, appeared in court on Sunday and Monday to hear the allegations.

Colbert Lets "Zero Dark Thirty" Director Call it "History" and "Accurate" and "Honest" and "Fair" and "Enhanced Interrogation"

Here's a question I would have asked: Are you aware that torture generated enemies and did not help find bin Laden as so grotesquely suggested by your film?

 

11 Years of Infamy -- US Actions at Guantanamo Prison

By Ann Wright, OpEdNews

Despite his January 22, 2009 executive order closing Guantanamo Prison in one year, President Obama ensured the continued operation of Guantanamo for another year by signing the National Defense Authorization Act of 2013, and refused to challenge the Congressional mandated ban on transfers from Guantánamo to the federal court and prison system in the United States.

::::::::

There are 166 out of 779 still imprisoned, including 87 cleared for release, but still held at Guantanamo
 

 
January 11, 2013, marked the 11th year that the infamous Guantanamo prison has been in operation by the United States. It is also 11 years that Hamid Karzai has the leader of Afghanistan. On January 11, President Karzai met with Barak Obama, the second US president who has presided over the war in Afghanistan. We don't know if President Karzai mentioned the 18 Afghans who remain in Guantanamo out of the 220 who were imprisoned.
 
But, no doubt there were discussions about the messy turnover of prisons in Afghanistan from US control to Afghan control, in which the US still refuses to hand over some prisoners. In 2012, 570 detainees were released after acquittal in Afghan courts with an additional 485 in the process of being released after a bilateral board of Afghans and Americans determined that there was not enough evidence to prosecute them. On the day prior to President Karzai's departure for Washington, another 80 prisoners were released.
 
It was 11 years ago, in late January, 2002, when I was on a helicopter that flew then interim-president Karzai from Kabul to Bagram Air Base for him to board a military aircraft for a flight to Washington, DC to meet with President Bush for the first time and for Karzai to be seated next to Laura Bush in the US Capitol gallery for President Bush's 2002 State of the Union message. At the time, I was in the US diplomatic corps and was on the small team that had reopened the US Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan in mid-December, 2001.

Grilled Brennan

The Grilling that Brennan Deserves

January 9, 2013

Editor Note: When President Obama’s national security nominees reach the Senate, the toughest challenge is expected against Chuck Hagel for Defense, but CIA Director-designee John Brennan has more to explain about his work over the past decade on the terror war’s “dark side,” says ex-CIA analyst Ray McGovern.

By Ray McGovern

As Washington’s pundit class sees it, Defense Secretary-designee Chuck Hagel deserves a tough grilling over his hesitancy to go to war with Iran and his controversial detection of a pro-Israel lobby operating in the U.S. capital, but prospective CIA Director John Brennan should get only a few polite queries about his role helping to create and sustain Dick Cheney’s “dark side.”

Consequences of Exposing Torture and John Brennan's Promoting Torture


Ironies of living in the post-Bush world: by Debra Sweet Director World Can't Wait
1. The only CIA operative connected to waterboarding and torture during the Bush regime to be jailed, John Kiriakou, will go to prison for giving an agent's name to reporters in connection with an investigation aimed at exposing enhanced interrogation techniques. The agents who did the torture face no sanctions at all, and in fact are glorified in popular culture, like the new film Zero Dark Thirty.

Judge Lind rules Bradley's treatment illegal but only gives 112 days sentencing credit

From the Bradley Manning Support Network

Only giving 112 days credit off any future prison sentence does little to keep the military from torturing any future soldiers awaiting controversial trials. Write Maj. General Horst, tell him the persecution of Bradley Manning is unnaceptable!


Judge Denise Lind. Sketch by Clark Stoeckley, Bradley Manning Support Network.

After two weeks of intense litigation by Bradley Manning's defense, and hearing how Quantico brig staff blatantly disregarded Navy Rules in their mistreatment of Bradley, military Judge Denise Lind acknowledged that Bradley was punished unlawfully before trial and she has awarded him 118 days sentencing credit.

For nine months in Quantico, VA, Bradley was held isolated in a 6x8 ft cell, and denied access to sunlight and meaningful exercise, conditions called "cruel, inhuman and degrading" by the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture. It was only after considerable public outcry and coordinated action that Bradley's conditions improved. The 112 days sentencing credit that Bradley has been awarded for being tortured is still vastly overshadowed by the outrageous 150 years in prison Bradley still faces.

Despite Bradley Manning's honorable intentions to blow the whistle on unpunished war crimes, torture and government corruption and the military's failure to show any harm done to the US as a result of his releases, Bradley is facing harsher prosecution (and persecution) than US soldiers who are guilty of murdering civilians in the Middle East. The extremely aggressive charges against him are no accident. They are intended to put a chill on military whistle-blowing. The man who set these charges? Maj. Gen. Karl Horst. Write to tell him that this persecution of an American patriot is unacceptable!

Maj. General Horst
7115 South Boundary Boulevard
MacDill AFB, FL
33621-5101
USA

The hearing continues through Friday, January 11. Bradley Manning’s court-martial trial is scheduled to start March 6, 2013.

Talk Nation Radio: Shahid Buttar on Spying, Detention, Torture, and Zero Dark Thirty

Shahid Buttar is the executive director the Bill of Rights Defense Committee and the People’s Campaign for the Constitution which works to defend civil liberties, constitutional rights, and rule of law principles threatened within the United States by law enforcement and intelligence agencies. He is a constitutional lawyer, grassroots organizer, independent columnist, musician, and poet. He discusses President Obama's signing of two new pieces of legislation permitting warrantless spying and indefinite detention.  He also discusses rendition, torture, and the new film "Zero Dark Thirty."

Total run time: 29:00

Host: David Swanson.
Producer: David Swanson.
Music by Duke Ellington.

Download or get embed code from Archive or  AudioPort or LetsTryDemocracy.

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Fast for Justice - Day 1

witness against torture header image

***we are in the midst of cleaning up our email lists - unsubscribe info at bottom***

WAT 2013 – “HUNGERING FOR JUSTICE”

DAY 1 – JANUARY 6th

Dear Friends,  

January 11, 2013 marks the eleventh anniversary of the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, the seventh anniversary of Witness Against Torture’s January 11 presence in D.C., and our fifth liquids fast.  Here we are again, pilgrims from across the country, gathering in D.C.  Though it is not to pay homage to the nation’s capital that we come, but to honor a common cause, a divine mandate in fact, “love one another.”  Even enemies, even strangers, undoubtedly those unjustly detained. 

                First Trinity has once again graciously allowed us their space and at a modest rate, though we are still looking to raise funds to cover the cost of rent, as well as liquid sustenance of juice and tea. The fast began this afternoon after a farewell-to-eating feast of pizza.  Though it is a somber cause for which we gather, the atmosphere was paradoxically celebratory as many friends who haven’t seen each other for months, or even since last year, are reunited.  As this struggle continues, we find joy in community.  And it is a community that is continually growing.  “We are a large circle,” Matt D. said at our first meeting of fasters, “but our circle is larger than faces you see.”  We know many of you across the country (and farther) are joining us, and very much feel your presence here. 

                These updates are a way of welcoming those of you who are with us, though not among us, into the circle.  We will include reflections from fasters present and apart, reports on actions and events, and links to relevant articles.  In addition to these updates we intend to connect with those who are interested via “fasters phone calls,” stay tuned for the call-in number!

                                                                In Peace,

                                                                                Witness Against Torture

Protest Zero Dark Thirty

The public "controversy" whipped up by release of the new torture movie Zero Dark Thirty is actually a re-hash of an argument that had largely been put to bed, that torture works to extract reliable intelligence from suspected terrorists (and even if it did, would that make the practice morally acceptable?) But torture IS effective in getting subjects to say what you want them to say, to fabricate rationale for government venture, such as the ultimate war crime of aggression on sovereign nations that pose no imminent threat.

92975_gal.jpg

Film director Kathryn Bigelow's reputation alone promises to draw a sizable audience; her pornographic depictions of CIA brutality may provide the titillation for many additional viewers, including the video game junkies that play Medal of Honor Warfighter. But this may very well not be the blockbuster that the film industry anticipates. Indeed, critical reviews of the movie, and the history of its making, may prove to be its undoing. Hollywood's hard sell might not be able to overcome revulsion to this kind of "entertainment."

I refuse to buy the lie that the Central Intelligence Agency has ever been a force for good, that extra-legal assassination is ever justified, that American lives are worth more than others. So no, I will not be screening this dangerous piece of CIA-friendly propaganda. I will however be outside theaters to protest this movie, of course, but also use this opportunity to promote the truth about the crimes of our government. I encourage readers to do the same. World Can't Wait will be out in orange jumpsuits to represent the Guantanamo prisoners that Obama has failed to release, flyering (download here), holding signs and banners, and loudly proclaiming that NO! Torture is always illegal, immoral, and unacceptable.

Join us for the first of what we hope to be many protests in the Bay Area:

    Friday, January 4th

    AMC Bay Street 16 Theater

    5614 Shellmound Street

    Emeryville

    11:00 AM to Noon  and  6:00 - 7:00 PM

See you there. And plan one for your own neighborhood. 

http://www.firejohnyoo.net/2013/01/sex-a-little-lies-a-lot-and-vi.html

Capitalism and Mental Illness: Back to the Future?

 

By Charles M. Young


A 21st century psychotherapist steps into a time machine and comes out in Atlanta in 1855. Having no other marketable skills, he hangs out a shingle and promises new remedies for mental illness. A well-dressed gentleman knocks on the door and inquires if the psychotherapist might come to his plantation to examine the slaves.


Resisting the Sirens of Torture: Deconstructing Zero Dark Thirty Response Memes and the Senate Intelligence CommitteeTorture Report

By Benjamin Davis,    SALT

By Benjamin G. Davis, Associate Professor of Law, University of Toledo College of Law

I. The payback meme (“I am against torture, but…”)

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