You are herecontent / BP Oil Spill Gulf Coverage: May 25, 2010, Day 36

BP Oil Spill Gulf Coverage: May 25, 2010, Day 36


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Drugs?

Quote: "On drugs:

During his interview, the MMS inspector initially denied using crystal methamphetamine, but he later admitted to it. He claimed that the last time he used crystal methamphetamine was the weekend of the 2009 Super Bowl, in February. He explained that he had never possessed or used crystal methamphetamine while at work but admitted that he might have been under the influence of the drug at work after using it the day before".

That's from the article, "Read the Govt’s Report Blasting Drilling Regulators on Ethics, Drugs and Porn", which is by Marian Wang, May 25th, and it provides very important and incriminating information about and against MMS officials and employees, or maybe the latter were also officials in the agency. It's an important article and I'll quote a little more from it.

"At one Gulf Coast office of MMS, agency officials attended sporting events on the dime of oil companies, stored porn on company computers, used cocaine and crystal meth, and falsified inspection reports. (The above links go directly to the relevant pages in the report, thanks to our ever-handy document viewer.)"

Excerpts from MMS emails for these above matters are provided in the propublica.org article.

Meth? That's a powerful, addictive and dangerous drug, based on what I've learned about it anyway. If they only consumed cocaine, which is fine at moderate doses and occasionally used, then this should never be a problem except for people allergic to real cocaine, which is not what most people would find on the street, for that stuff is far from being pure cocaine and, as far as I know, it's crack. That contains cocaine, but, and from what I've read about it, "crystal meth." and possibly some other drugs created in labs, instead of being derived from plants. I've known moderate cocaine consumers well before crack became known and another person would not be able to know unless told. It didn't impair their abilities. But I've never heard or read of anything safe about consuming meth.

The porn stuff is dumb and unprofessional, but porn lovers should still be able to competently do their work professionally. Their porn sickness shouldn't impair them in this respect.

Falsified inspection reports? These people need to be prosecuted and convicted.

What a govt!

"BP Acknowledges Oil Spill Is Larger Than Previous Estimates" (approx. 6 minutes), May 21, 2010

http://www.democracynow.org/2010/5/21/oil

The British oil company BP has been forced to admit the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is far larger than the company initially said. On Thursday, BP said it’s now capturing 5,000 barrels of oil a day from the leaking pipe—the same amount it had previously said was leaking every day. BP has declined to estimate how much oil is still escaping, but scientists say BP is siphoning just a fraction of the total leak. Independent scientists say the leak could be as large as 95,000 barrels of oil per day. We speak to Alaskan marine biologist Rick Steiner, who has been spending time in the Gulf region. [includes rush transcript]

Guest:

Rick Steiner, Alaskan marine biologist who has been spending time in the Gulf region. He’s a former University of Alaska fisheries extension agent.

At the start of this DN! report, Purdue professor Steve Wurly (spelling) is shown being questioned by Democratic Congress member Markey (spelling?) about whether or not the 5,000 figure stated by BP is realistic and the professor says that several scientists give a far higher number.

Re. Rick Steiner, I listened to an interview with him some weeks ago and think it was on DN! It became immediately clear to me that he's a very good or important resource person on the oil spill in the Gulf, as well as with respect to the continuing consequences of the Exxon Valdez spill; definitely someone to listen to and learn from.

He says that instead of the 6mn gallons of oil produced by this spill so far, according to reported estimates, it could be as high as around 120mn and definitely is much more than 6mn.

The chemical dispersants:

He also speaks about the dispersant(s) used by BP, saying that the "dispersants are toxic" and that the "combination of the dispersant with the oil is a compounded toxicity greater than either the dispersion of the oil in isolation, and plus it pushes the oil down off the sea surface into the water column, exposing the vast pelagic ecosystem to contamination".

The subsurface plumes:

"Plus, we’re also very worried about the subsurface plumes that we know form from these deepwater blowouts. You know, I don’t think a lot of the oil, or maybe even most of it, has yet to surface. So we have—we have a real catastrophe on our hands ...".

It's a short interview with him, but the rest of what he said is important and activists should definitely should listen to everything he says about this oil industry disaster; as well as what he says about the continuing consequences of the Exxon Valdez spill, which he spoke of in the interview just below.

The interview with him a couple of weeks ago and which is important from an environmental p.o.v., while also including a briefer interview with Peter Maass about a related legal issue, is the following one.

"As Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Spreads, BP, Halliburton and Transocean Executives Deflect Blame for Spill at Senate Hearings" (approx. 37 minutes), May 12th, 2010

http://www.democracynow.org/shows/2010/5/12

As thousands of gallons of oil continue to spew daily from a damaged well in the Gulf of Mexico, representatives from BP, Transocean and Halliburton were grilled by lawmakers in back-to-back hearings on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Industry executives from all three corporations began with prepared testimony that involved blaming each other for the explosion and deflecting responsibility for the unfolding environmental and economic disaster. We air excerpts and speak with marine biologist Rick Steiner. For the past week he has been working at the site of the oil spill and on the Louisiana coast, where he collected several samples of the oil washing up ashore.

During the same DN! hour was a separate interview with Peter Maass and it's based on his book, "Crude World: The Violent Twilight of Oil". It's linked as a related interview just below the brief bio. for Rick Steiner in this above May 12th page. It's not about this Gulf oil leakage. Instead, it's about the environmental destroyer that the oil industry is globally.

These people are clearly good resource persons for activists and other environmentally concerned people to pay attention to.

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