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History and Conscience Demands We Prosecute for Murder before Torture


Let us abandon the straw man case for the prosecution of Bush for torture. The fastest, most rational path to restore respect for human rights to our culture is to prosecute George W. Bush for the murder over 4,310 of our own soldiers who died in Bush’s illegal war. By prosecuting Bush for the illegal deaths of our own soldiers, he will pay the debt owed to over a million Iraqi’s who have also died. According to Vincent Bugliosi, the renowned attorney, it is a waste of precious time to discuss anything besides “The Prosecution of Gorge W. Bush for Murder” (2008 New York Times bestseller).

Let us end discussions on whether we can bring the criminals to trial: it is too much like discussing how many demons can set fire to the head of a pin. Let us stop wasting our time. Let us join Vincent Bugliosi in his call for THE PROSECUTION OF GEORGE W. BUSH FOR MURDER----NOW. It is time to stop conscious banter with those who have no conscience. Once the process of prosecuting Bush for murder is activated in any valid court, the house of cards protecting the war criminals will tumble much faster. It is time to turn off the pundit shows and take the power away from the talking heads like Keith Olbermann who recently had the gall to insinuate that Dick Cheney had better change his tune if he and his cohorts ever want to have power in this country again. How could anyone suggest that Dick Cheney could continue with governance of any organization without being prosecuted for the high crimes he has committed including ordering torture, conning us into the war in Iraq, and committing treason by outing a CIA operative? Condoleezza Rice implies agreement with Nixon’s perspective that the President is above when she says, “the President instructed us that nothing we would do would be outside our obligations, our legal obligations under the conventions against torture…and so if it was authorized by the President, it did not violate our obligations under the Convention Against Torture.” The President cannot order others to break any established United States’ law. Of course, this applies to torture, and, more importantly, it applies to murder. Congressman Robert Wexler is currently introducing legislation to create a special congressional committee with subpoena powers and a special investigator to investigate the Bush Administration. Hopefully, this legislation will pass and as the case opens up, we shall proceed with most important issue: the prosecution of those guilty of the murder of over 4,310 American soldiers and over one million Iraqis.

The mass media leads the populace away from the real issue and makes the sheeple think that those who are smarter and more powerful than they, have all the answers and that those answers lead the sheeple away from calling for the prosecution of George W. Bush and his cronies for murder. The con is that we, the people are just as smart and more powerful than the few in control of the media, the government and the federal banking system.

Torture is a heinous criminal act and leaves deeps physical and psychological scars on the victim. However, murder imposes death upon living beings. More than 1.3 million Iraqis have died in the illegal Iraq war. Children comprise 60% of the population in Iraq. As reported in the media, about 80% the people killed in the bombing raids are children and women. Justice demands that those responsible for the crime of mass murder be prosecuted.

There should be no time wasted in weighing the pros and cons of whether to prosecute those who participated in murder and torture in the Bush administration. Promoting discussion of the topic of whether to prosecute for torture is an obvious attempt to obfuscate the issue: torture is a crime, and those who participated in torturing prisoners are criminals. Why then, proceed with discussion? Wouldn’t it be more logical to proceed with the prosecutions? All effort should then be put towards the most important prosecution of George W. Bush for the unjust murder of our dear soldiers and, therefore, also for the most heinous crime: mass murder of a defenseless population.

We need not waste time discussing whether torture is a criminal act and/or whether those that supported it and implemented it should be prosecuted: that is no longer debatable. History has answered that question: the world decided torture is criminal after WWII, and that decision has been carved in stone through the efficacy of the Nuremberg Trials. Nazi criminals who were charged with genocide, mass murder, torture, and other atrocities used the defense, “I was only following orders”, which is now known as “The Nuremberg Defense”.  It was found that the “Nuremberg Defense” is, in fact, no defense at all.  Those criminals paid for their crimes with death or life imprisonment. Their sentencing and payment is a final testament to the validity of their heinous acts: one that no compassionate human being could ever ignore. We grew up knowing that their sentences would stop future criminals from repeating their acts. That is why we spoke the words, “Never again.”

Recently, in his ethics report, H. Marshall Jarret obfuscates the truth by stating John Yoo and Jay Bybee are guilty of “misconduct” (just as President Obama stated that Bush made some “mistakes”) and should face disciplinary action, which could possibly include disbarment, from their state bar associations. Jarret obfuscates the obvious and compelling point: these lawyers along with Bradbury cannot claim that they were just “following orders” by recommending torture. They cannot refuse to admit the obvious: their legal opinions supported the views their bosses espoused and wanted to implement. It doesn’t matter-- “Which came first, ---the lawyers’ espousal of torturing as a legal method of gathering intelligence or Cheney, Bush and Rumsfeld ordering torture---they are all guilty of participation in the criminal act of torture. It matters that all of these sociopaths espoused using torture on sentient human beings. Torture is deigned a criminal act both internationally and nationally. Now, we have learned, through the release of documentary evidence, that key members of Congress were briefed on the torture techniques ordered by the administration and, therefore, colluded with the torture policy during its implementation. No wonder Nancy Pelosi said that impeachment was “off the table”.

Those who participated in supporting and condoning torture and murder in WWII received death sentences at Nuremberg and in Japan. The following incomplete list of Nazi high officials in the Nazi party, were lawyers who received death sentences murder: Rosenberg, attorney and a racial theory ideologist; Hans Frank, attorney and the Legal Leader of the Reich; Wilhelm Frick, attorney and Hitler’s Minister of the Interior who authored the Racial Laws; Walther Funk (studied law), moved from Nazi propagandist to Minister of Economics; Ernst Kaltenbruner, attorney and Chief of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (the RSHA, the Central Nazi Intelligence Organization); and Arthur Seyss-Inquart, attorney and responsible for incorporating Austria into the Third Reich. All of these lawyers supported Hitler’s Final Solution with their legal opinions: all of them were sentenced to death.

After WWII, the United States tried, convicted and hung Japanese who water boarded American soldiers, so there should be no discussion of whether water boarding is legal or not. Our own history bears clear witness to water boarding being a high crime punishable by execution. Wikipedia states, “waterboarding precipitates a gag reflex almost immediately.[13] The technique does not inevitably cause lasting physical damage. It can cause extreme pain, dry drowning, damage to lungs, brain damage from oxygen deprivation, other physical injuries including broken bones due to struggling against restraints, lasting psychological damage or, ultimately, death.[4] Adverse physical consequences can start manifesting months after the event; psychological effects can last for years.[14]”

Many citizens of Earth believed Nazi-type atrocities would never happen again. Then, Bush ordered an illegal war and forced its implementation based on lies to the American Congress and the naïve American populace. The world looked up to the United States as a role model that had outlawed torture globally until Bush and leading individuals within his administration ordered torture. Unfortunately, the criminals and their sentences at Nuremberg and in Japan did not quell the blood lust of Bush and his cohorts. As conscientious and empathic citizens, we must proceed to demand prosecution for murder. It is the most expedient path to justice. According to Bugliosi, any district attorney in the United States who had just one soldier die in his county can prosecute George W. Bush for murder. Since murder is a much more serious crime with heavier penalties, wouldn’t it be more rational to put all of our resources into prosecution for murder and follow that prosecution, if necessary, with the prosecution for torture? Bugliosi states that Bush’s guilt for the crime of murder can be proven, because the case for murder rests upon clearly marked statutes. There are some problems with the case for torture. You can find Bugliosi’s explanation of those problems here. You can find Bugliosi’s ironclad case for the prosecution of Bush for murder in your local library and bookstore.

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It's truly a sad commentary concerning the American character that, so far, there has been a massive failure on the part of the bulk of our politicians -- with a few notable exceptions, such as Congressman Wexler -- as well as among the majority of Americans to support Vincent Bugliosi in his call to prosecute George W. Bush for murder.

Although the lessons of what happened to those who participated in supporting and condoning torture and murder in WWII should remain fresh in our minds, the passage of time seems to have eroded the memory of those lessons, and due to the failure of the current generation of adults who sit in the seats of authority to remember those lessons, to act accordingly, and to pass onto the next generation a sense of history about the crimes of the past, as well as the moral imperative to remain vigilant so these "crimes against humanity" will never be committed, and that those who are guilty of such crimes will be punished to the fullest extent of the law.

Sadly, because of our growing deafness to the lessons of history, especially as the voices of those who lived through that history are silenced, it would appear that the utilitarian doctrines which were the foundation of the Nazis's criminal behavior during WWII are still very much alive and well and are being practiced by those who are in the seats of government, and are being condoned by the majority of the American people. It's as though the American conscience, which demanded justice for those who suffered under Nazi rule by participating in the Nuremberg Trials, has been seared shut to the point where genuine compassion for others is becoming rare, and the mind-set of "virtuous victimization" has set up a stronghold in the minds of many.

Consider this ... the mass murder of a defenseless population, along with acts of brutal torture being committed against innocent people who joined so-called "insurgent" groups because the group offered them some hope for a future, should stoke the fires of righteous indignation among the American people, and spur them into taking concerted political action to insure that the murderers of the innocent were punished. Yet, that has not happened. Instead, the mass media spends a lot of time either covering up the truth, or deliberately changing or distorting the truth to suit the agendas of those in the halls of power.

And even though "we, the people are just as smart and more powerful than the few in control of the media", we've allowed ourselves to act out the role of the poor "little victim" who is brutalized by a "mean" world, and who feels incompetent, incapable and totally helpless against seemingly powerful forces which the "victim" cannot understand or comprehend. The "virtuous victim" game, which the media constantly peddles to us, serves as a distraction; to get us so focused on our own problems to the point where the compassion and empathy which we should be extending toward others by taking concerted political action, is instead turned inward, spent on "poor-me-baby" pity parties, passivity and apathy.

So long as we fail to remember and act upon the lessons of history, and to take action to insure the speedy prosecution of George W. Bush for the murder of 4,284 of our own soldiers, and as long as we continue to act out the role of the "virtuous victim", the blood lust of Bush and his cohorts will be repeated, as it is being repeated now, with the domestic and international policies of the Obama Administration, history will condemn us -- in the strongest way possible -- for our failure to act as conscientious and empathic citizens, because we sat silently by (or cheered in approval) as we allowed millions of innocent people to die in our name when we had the power within us to stop it.

Quote from Stephie1776:
It's as though the American conscience, which demanded justice for those who suffered under Nazi rule by participating in the Nuremberg Trials, has been seared shut to the point where genuine compassion for others is becoming rare, and the mind-set of "virtuous victimization" has set up a stronghold in the minds of many.

As you know, that's the intent and effect of the propaganda administered to the masses on a daily basis by the MI[M]C (Military-Industrial-MEDIA Complex).

Quote from Stephie1776:
Yet, that has not happened. Instead, the mass media spends a lot of time either covering up the truth, or deliberately changing or distorting the truth to suit the agendas of those in the halls of power.

Correct. That's precisely what some of us have been screaming about. But variations in priority and personality clashes tend to make cohesion in protesting the matter difficult.

Quote from Stephie1776:
the blood lust of Bush and his cohorts will be repeated, as it is being repeated now, with the domestic and international policies of the Obama Administration...

Right again, Stephie. With no disincentive from prosecutions, there will be nothing to stop future rogue administrations from picking up where Bush and Cheney left off, and doing so with full impunity.

Quote from Stephie1776:
history will condemn us...

I'm afraid it already has.

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