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Tomgram: Andrew Bacevich, The U.S. Military as Quagmire Specialists


By Andy Kroll - Posted on 08 October 2010

This story originally appeared at TomDispatch.com.

Consider this: the number three book at Amazon.com at the moment is entitled Obama’s Wars, and yet the war that may most truly turn out to be the president’s seems only now to be gaining steam.  Is it a case of premature titling?

I’m talking, of course, about the U.S. war in (with?) Pakistan.  Last Saturday, the Wall Street Journal reported that the CIA was ready to beg, borrow, or steal any armed drone the U.S. military could spare to expand what has morphed from a “covert” assassination campaign against al-Qaeda and Taliban leaders into something closer to a full-scale robot air war over the Pakistani tribal borderlands, especially North Waziristan.

As the CIA’s drone war escalates, so have airborne border crossings of a different sort.  U.S. helicopters are pursuing “fleeing” Taliban fighters as part of what the military terms armed “self-defense,” once known as “hot pursuit,” into those Pakistani “sanctuaries” from which the Taliban is said to be conducting its own successful surge in Afghanistan.  ("Enraged and embarrassed," Pakistani officials have responded to the incursions by closing a key border crossing that supplies the American war effort in Afghanistan -- and the Taliban has torched a series of fuel trucks left idling near Islamabad, the Pakistani capital, by that blocked crossing.)  Clearly escalating as well is the frustration of U.S. commanders at an enemy elusively lurking across a largely unmarked frontier.

And what’s happened so far may be only the beginning.  In his new book, Bob Woodward reports that Obama administration officials, military and civilian, were eager to do something more in Pakistan as early as the fall of 2009.  As Dennis Blair, the Director of National Intelligence, put it obliquely but clearly enough to the Pakistani ambassador at the time, if his country didn’t agree to a “strategic partnership,” essentially by moving against militant networks in North Waziristan, “[W]e will have to do what we must to protect U.S. interests.”  Last Sunday, Greg Miller of the Washington Post reported that the administration's Afghan War “review” back then had actually “centered largely on the need to eliminate insurgent sanctuaries in Pakistan.” He also noted that Afghan War commander General David Petraeus is now advocating “a more aggressive posture with Pakistan, and [has] been particularly supportive of the CIA drone effort.”

If one passage in recent news reports raised a warning flag, however, it’s this eerie one from Saturday's Wall Street Journal, which should give any reader the creeps: “U.S. officials say a successful terrorist strike against the West emanating from Pakistan could force the U.S. to take unilateral military action -- an outcome all parties are eager to avoid.”  Such a strike would “force” the U.S. “to take unilateral military action”?  Think about that for a moment.  Amid a sudden drumbeat of announcements of possible strikes by Pakistani-based terrorist groups in Europe, there may, in fact, be a growing contingent of U.S. military and civilian officials so frustrated with the disastrous war in Afghanistan that they are ready to expand the war significantly in Pakistan, and are only awaiting the necessary excuse to do so.

Talk about playing with fire.  Pakistan isn’t Afghanistan.  Further major escalations of the American war in that country -- flailing responses to ongoing failure -- would be asking for trouble of every sort.  Ask long enough, and it will come.  With that in mind, consider the assessment Andrew Bacevich, author of the bestselling Washington Rules: America’s Path to Permanent War, offers of the first nine years of war in Afghanistan (and Pakistan).  To catch Bacevich discussing how the U.S. military became specialists in quagmires in a Timothy MacBain TomCast audio interview click here or, to download it to your iPod, here.  Tom

The Long War: Year Ten 
Lost in the Desert with the GPS on the Fritz 

By Andrew J. Bacevich

In January 1863, President Abraham Lincoln’s charge to a newly-appointed commanding general was simplicity itself: “give us victories.”  President Barack Obama’s tacit charge to his generals amounts to this: give us conditions permitting a dignified withdrawal.  A pithy quote in Bob Woodward’s new book captures the essence of an emerging Obama Doctrine: “hand it off and get out.”

Getting into a war is generally a piece of cake.  Getting out tends to be another matter altogether -- especially when the commander-in-chief and his commanders in the field disagree on the advisability of doing so.

Happy Anniversary, America.  Nine years ago today -- on October 7, 2001 -- a series of U.S. air strikes against targets across Afghanistan launched the opening campaign of what has since become the nation’s longest war.  Three thousand two hundred and eighty five days later the fight to determine Afghanistan’s future continues.  At least in part, “Operation Enduring Freedom” has lived up to its name:  it has certainly proven to be enduring. 

As the conflict formerly known as the Global War on Terror enters its tenth year, Americans are entitled to pose this question: When, where, and how will the war end?  Bluntly, are we almost there yet?

Of course, with the passage of time, where “there” is has become increasingly difficult to discern.  Baghdad turned out not to be Berlin and Kandahar is surely not Tokyo.  Don’t look for CNN to be televising a surrender ceremony anytime soon.

This much we know: an enterprise that began in Afghanistan but soon after focused on Iraq has now shifted back -- again -- to Afghanistan.  Whether the swings of this pendulum signify progress toward some final objective is anyone’s guess. 

To measure progress during wartime, Americans once employed pins and maps.  Plotting the conflict triggered by 9/11 will no doubt improve your knowledge of world geography, but it won’t tell you anything about where this war is headed.

Where, then, have nine years of fighting left us?  Chastened, but not necessarily enlightened.

Just over a decade ago, the now-forgotten Kosovo campaign seemingly offered a template for a new American way of war.  It was a decision gained without suffering a single American fatality.  Kosovo turned out, however, to be a one-off event.  No doubt the United States military was then (and remains today) unbeatable in traditional terms.  Yet, after 9/11, Washington committed that military to an endeavor that it manifestly cannot win. 

Rather than probing the implications of this fact -- relying on the force of arms to eliminate terrorism is a fool’s errand -- two administrations have doggedly prolonged the war even as they quietly ratcheted down expectations of what it might accomplish. 

In officially ending the U.S. combat role in Iraq earlier this year -- a happy day if there ever was one -- President Obama refrained from proclaiming “mission accomplished.”  As well he might: as U.S. troops depart Iraq, insurgents remain active and in the field.  Instead of declaring victory, the president simply urged Americans to turn the page.  With remarkable alacrity, most of us seem to have complied.

Perhaps more surprisingly, today’s military leaders have themselves abandoned the notion that winning battles wins wars, once the very foundation of their profession.  Warriors of an earlier day insisted: “There is no substitute for victory.”  Warriors in the Age of David Petraeus embrace an altogether different motto: “There is no military solution.” 

Here is Brigadier General H. R. McMaster, one of the Army’s rising stars, summarizing the latest in advanced military thinking:  “Simply fighting and winning a series of interconnected battles in a well developed campaign does not automatically deliver the achievement of war aims.”  Winning as such is out.  Persevering is in.  

So an officer corps once intent above all on avoiding protracted wars now specializes in quagmires.  Campaigns don’t really end.  At best, they peter out. 

Formerly trained to kill people and break things, American soldiers now attend to winning hearts and minds, while moonlighting in assassination.  The politically correct term for this is "counterinsurgency."

Now, assigning combat soldiers the task of nation-building in, say, Mesopotamia is akin to hiring a crew of lumberjacks to build a house in suburbia.  What astonishes is not that the result falls short of perfection, but that any part of the job gets done at all.

Yet by simultaneously adopting the practice of “targeted killing,” the home builders do double-duty as home wreckers.  For American assassins, the weapon of choice is not the sniper rifle or the shiv, but missile-carrying pilotless aircraft controlled from bases in Nevada and elsewhere thousands of miles from the battlefield -- the ultimate expression of an American desire to wage war without getting our hands dirty.    

In practice, however, killing the guilty from afar not infrequently entails killing innocents as well.  So actions undertaken to deplete the ranks of jihadists as far afield as Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia unwittingly ensure the recruitment of replacements, guaranteeing a never-ending supply of hardened hearts to soften. 

No wonder the campaigns launched since 9/11 drag on and on.  General Petraeus himself has spelled out the implications: “This is the kind of fight we're in for the rest of our lives and probably our kids' lives.”  Obama may want to “get out.”  His generals are inclined to stay the course.

Taking longer to achieve less than we initially intended is also costing far more than anyone ever imagined.  Back in 2003, White House economic adviser Lawrence Lindsey suggested that invading Iraq might run up a tab of as much as $200 billion -- a seemingly astronomical sum.  Although Lindsey soon found himself out of a job as a result, he turned out to be a piker.  The bill for our post-9/11 wars already exceeds a trillion dollars, all of it piled atop our mushrooming national debt.  Helped in no small measure by Obama's war policies, the meter is still running. 

So are we almost there yet?  Not even.  The truth is we’re lost in the desert, careening down an unmarked road, odometer busted, GPS on the fritz, and fuel gauge hovering just above E.  Washington can only hope that the American people, napping in the backseat, won’t notice.

Andrew J. Bacevich is professor of history and international relations at Boston University.  His bestselling new book is Washington Rules: America’s Path to Permanent War.  To catch Bacevich discussing how the U.S. military became specialists in quagmires in a Timothy MacBain TomCast audio interview click here or, to download it to your iPod, here.

Copyright 2010 Andrew J. Bacevich

I posted links for and excerpts from some articles about this bogus U.S. alert about the really non-existent threat of terrorist strikes in Europe from some Pakistanis. These links and excerpts are in what is now the #6 post for the article, below. The post has the same subject title as used for this post, so people can copy "terrorist strikes in Europe" or "#6" (without the quotes) to use for a Web page search to jump quickly to comment post.

http://warisacrime.org/content/10th-year-longest-war-begins-flood-bad-ne...

It was a bogus alert that the U.S. issued. And I guess it likely was scaremongering for trying to get some political gain in some regard; like to try to get greater European contribution to the "war effort", f.e. There was no valid reason and the alert quickly was strongly denounced in Europe.

The Bush administration pressured Tom Ridge to issue what he's said were [false] terror alerts, when pressuring him to raise the alert levels. I believe he was Homeland Security Director at the time and he said he knew these were false at the time, but did as he was pressured to do anyway.

Scaremongering is a U.S. elite practice.

Rather than probing the implications of this fact -- relying on the force of arms to eliminate terrorism is a fool’s errand -- two administrations have doggedly prolonged the war even as they quietly ratcheted down expectations of what it might accomplish.

The war never was truly about ending or eliminating terrorism.

In officially ending the U.S. combat role in Iraq earlier this year -- a happy day if there ever was one -- President Obama refrained from proclaiming “mission accomplished.”

Obama was right to refrain from doing that and "the U.S. combat role in Iraq" is officially over, but that's also a lot of bs. Happy day for who? Definitely no good news has come yet for Iraqis and the U.S. has a new "Green Zone" there now. There's an article about the new GZ a little further below.

Don't count on the U.S. really withdrawing (in full) from Iraq anytime soon. The U.S. remains strongly in control there even if it has some political competition from Iran. And the U.S. still has a strong foreign military presence there, especially if people don't forget the many thousands of experienced "security" contractors, mercenaries, from the U.S. and other countries.

U.S. troops also haven't been staying on their bases. They have been doing "tours" with forces of the puppet Iraqi government, and killing innocent and unarmed Iraqis; including cold-bloodedly. They haven't killed thousands of Iraqis during this short time period, but they haven't been staying on bases and have killed innocent and unarmed Iraqis when it was clear that they were unarmed.

"New ‘Green Zone’ emerging in Baghdad"

by Ali Shitab, Azzaman.com, October 9, 2010

http://www.uruknet.info/?p=m70596

The appellation 'Green Zone’ is in fact a euphemism the U.S. coined to escape being accused of pursuing former leader Saddam Hussien’s oppressive tactics.

(snip)

Very little has changed since U.S. invasion troops removed Saddam Hussein. His palaces and security and army headquarters, which were no-go and highly protected areas, were turned into new bastions for U.S. military and civilian administration.

It is indeed a 'war zone’ rather than a 'green zone’. It is in this zone where U.S. attacks on Iraqi cities are planned and where rules and regulations are drafted which have allowed U.S. marines and their security guards to kill civilian Iraqis with total impunity.

(snip)

At least under Saddam Hussein the residential areas close to his presidential complex (Green Zone for the U.S.) felt secure if they obeyed orders.

(snip)

Baghdad now has another 'green zone’ in the densely populated neighborhood of Karrada; but this one is for U.S. security guards, the fearsome, and trigger-happy mercenaries hired to protect U.S. officials and interests and kill Iraqis with impunity.

A company recruiting these mercenaries – they are hired to fight for a salary that brushes $25,000 a month – has turned a string of hotels behind the National Theater in Karrada into a no-go area.

The company has blocked streets leading to these hotels and no Iraqi is allowed to enter the area including high ranking government officials without special U.S. permits.

(snip)

Many residents in the area have lost their jobs as they can no longer open their shops. (snip)

(snip)

Lastly, while Andrew Bacevich's article seems a little humorous, it has extremely little to no value for information.

He does say that Obama purportedly wants the U.S. military to end the war asap and withdraw from Afghanistan, but even if Obama has stated as much in front of a U.S. news reporter, this does not mean that it's not political stage acting. So far, and from what I've gathered, Obama hasn't given any real sign of really wanting the war over and for the U.S. and allied forces to withdraw. He has always supported the phony "war on terrorism". Et cetera.

A lot of words in politics are lies, for deceiving the public, and so on.

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