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Pulling up the Ladder at Yahoo: Marissa Mayer's Faustian Bargain


By dlindorff - Posted on 07 March 2013

 

By Alfredo Lopez


The recent order by Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, forbidding Yahoo employees from doing their Yahoo work at home, might seem justified. After all, companies tell their employees what to do and Mayer might have good reasons for this edict. But the memo and its fallout raise serious and significant questions about technology, culture and women's role in both.


Major technology corporations like Yahoo control so much of the information we have and how we exchange it that their policies find their way into our lives and help define our culture. This decision is a retrenchment in the collaborative way we work and the role of women in that collaboration. Its ironic that a woman who arises from collaborative culture would be an advocate for that retrenchment.


For many of us, life is like walking on a street of uneven pavement; at some point, you're certain to stumble and fall. Marissa Mayer, in her 37 years of life, appears to have found an alternate route. Her profile reads like a fairy tale filled with corporate castles and technological blessings, begging the observer to search for some faustian bargain signed in computer code.


With a Master's Degree from Stanford University, a top University for techies, she was one of the first employees at Google and ripped through 13 years of work there as a key team leader for, at one time or the other, Google Search, Google Images, Google News, Google Maps, Google Books, Google Product Search, Google Toolbar, iGoogle and Gmail. She earned a well-deserved rep -- replete with profiles in the industry press -- as one of the keys to that mega-company's dizzying success.


In July 2012, Yahoo (Google's principal Internet rival) announced that Mayer would take over its reins and she simultaneously announced that she was pregnant. The glowing articles tumbled. She was, in the view of many technology and business writers, a prime example of the "new woman executive": one who could produce profitable companies while producing babies, manage staff while managing a relationship, look "gorgeous" while looking serious and use the "female tools" of perks, compliments and inspiring speeches to motivate some staff while using the "male tools" of threats, firing, and marginalization to discipline others...


For the rest of this article by ALFREDO LOPEZ in ThisCantBeHappening!, the new independent Project Censored Award-winning online alternative newspaper, please go to:www.thiscantbehappening.net/node/1619

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