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Military and their Families if Gov ShutDown


By jimstaro - Posted on 06 April 2011

If the teabaggers get their ShutDown Congress has to pass a Special Bill just so our Military Personal, at war in their wars of choice, Can Get Paid!

Report: Shutdown would hurt military families

Apr 6, 2011 - The pay freeze that would come with an extended government shutdown would severely hurt military families and require the military to organize financial help for those who don’t have savings to cover bills, a nonpartisan arm of Congress is warning lawmakers.

A shutdown could come as early as midnight Friday. As a months-long dispute over federal spending continues, the White House’s Office of Management and Budget warned Wednesday morning that military members would be expected to report to work without pay. The military will be fully paid once government funding is restored, Obama administration officials said.

Defense Department officials said the military would be paid April 15 if there is a government shutdown, but paychecks would cover only April 1 through April 8, meaning they would be half of the normal amount. There would be no pay April 29 if a shutdown extends for that long. {continued}

And hutchinson has the nerve to say:

“I don’t want one more minute of stress on our military,”

This comes on the heals of a report just issued, which follows a number of reports over these past years:

Study Finds Children's Learning Suffers When Parents Are Deployed

April 6, 2011 - After nearly a decade of U.S. military action in Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere, extended deployments have become a new norm—and an academic and emotional burden—for military children.

Army children coping with a parent’s long-term deployment—19 months or more—have lower test scores than their peers, including other military children, according to a new study by the RAND Corp.’s Arroyo Center, in Santa Monica, Calif., which conducts research for the military. Yet their problems can fly under the radar of school staff who have not been trained to support them, researchers found.

“Unfortunately, we don’t find [the results] surprising,” said Kathleen Facon, the chief of educational partnerships for the Department of Defense Education Activity, which operates military schools on bases. “One of the greatest difficulties military children will face, regardless of additional stresses of relocation and school transition, is the effect of being apart from one or both parents who have been deployed.” {continued}

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