Now Bush says he was only spying on people with "a history of blowing up trains, weddings and churches"

By John in DC, http://americablog.blogspot.com

From Reuters:
In Crawford, Texas, where Bush is spending the holidays, his spokesman, Trent Duffy, defended what he called a "limited program."

"This is not about monitoring phone calls designed to arrange Little League practice or what to bring to a potluck dinner," he told reporters. "These are designed to monitor calls from very bad people to very bad people who have a history of blowing up commuter trains, weddings, and churches."

White House Leaked Classified Intelligence to Make its Case for War

By David Swanson

A new report looks into instances in which the Bush Administration leaked classified information to support its case that Iraq was a threat to the United States.

While that case was, of course, ridiculous and the information falsified, the leaking of it was illegal. And the leaks appear to have been part of a coordinated effort. Immediately following important leaks, top administration officials appeared on talk shows to discuss information that they could not have legally discussed had it not appeared in a newspaper that morning.

Auld Lang Impeachment

By Madeleine Begun Kane

I thought I'd help everyone celebrate New Year's Eve with my Auld Lang Impeachment.

Auld Lang Impeachment -- Song Parody (Sing to Auld Lang Syne)

Bush/Cheney's wrongs won't be forgot.

US Embassy Close to Admitting Syria Rendition Flight

By Ewen MacAskill, The Guardian UK

Statement contradicts ambassador's interview. Correction could leave Britain open to challenge.

The US embassy in London was forced to issue a correction yesterday to an interview given by the ambassador, Robert Tuttle, in which he claimed America would not fly suspected terrorists to Syria, which has one of the worst torture records in the Middle East. A statement acknowledged media reports of a suspect taken from the US to Syria.

The Hidden State Steps Forward

By Jonathan Schell, The Nation

When the New York Times revealed that George W. Bush had ordered the National Security Agency to wiretap the foreign calls of American citizens without seeking court permission, as is indisputably required by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), passed by Congress in 1978, he faced a decision. Would he deny the practice, or would he admit it? He admitted it. But instead of expressing regret, he took full ownership of the deed, stating that his order had been entirely justified, that he had in fact renewed it thirty times, that he would continue to renew it and-going even more boldly on the offensive-that those who had made his law-breaking known had committed a "shameful act." As justification, he offered two arguments, one derisory, the other deeply alarming. The derisory one was that Congress, by authorizing him to use force after September 11, had authorized him to suspend FISA, although that law is unmentioned in the resolution. Thus has Bush informed the members of a supposedly co-equal ranch of government of what, unbeknownst to themselves, they were thinking when they cast their vote. The alarming argument is that as Commander in Chief he possesses "inherent" authority to suspend laws in wartime. But if he can suspend FISA at his whim and in secret, then what law can he not suspend? What need is there, for example, to pass or not pass the Patriot Act if any or all of its provisions can be secretly exceeded by the President?

A Veteran's Iraq Message Upsets Army Recruiters

By Monica Davey, The New York Times

Duluth, Minn. - As those thinking of becoming soldiers arrive on the slushy doorstep of the Army recruiting station here, they cannot miss the message posted in bold black letters on the storefront right next door.

Bush’s Uranium Lies

Bush’s Uranium Lies: The Case For A Special Prosecutor That Could Lead To Impeachment
Written by Francis T. Mandanici, June 29, 2005,
revised December 27, 2005

In the indictment of I. Lewis (Scooter) Libby, the special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald charged that Libby violated various criminal statutes when he made false and fraudulent statements to FBI agents and when he basically repeated those statements to a grand jury and thereby obstructed grand jury proceedings.

What Next? Pedophilia?

Latest on NoQuarter.
By Larry C. Johnson

Do you think that John Woo, the guy who authored the Department of Justice memo justifiying torture, believes that pedophilia is okay as long as the President believes it is necessary to save the nation? That my friends, as absurd as it sounds, is the thrust of the logic underpining the arguments Woo and his buddies are making. Their assault on the traditional conservative view that the power of Federal Government should be limited is truly frightening. In the name of saving the nation they insist that international accords against torture and inhumane treatment no longer apply. They are also on board for holding American citizens in prison indefinitely without a chance to confront their accusers in court. If it is done in the name of "national security" it is okay.

US plan to bug Security Council: the text

The Observer

Online document: The text of the memorandum detailing the US plan to bug the phones and emails of key Security Council members, revealed in today's Observer

Impeachment Buzz

By Ruth Conniff, http://progressive.org

What sense does it make that some of the same Washington media and political leaders who countenanced the Clinton impeachment over a semen-stained dress, somberly intoning about the "rule of law," consider impeaching Bush beyond the pale?

Over 20 Dead, 46 Wounded in Guerrilla War

Over 20 Dead, 46 Wounded in Guerrilla War; Governor of Diyala Wounded in Assassination Attempt, Sunnis Threaten Boycott
Informed Comment

A wave of guerrilla bombings and apparently coordinated small arms attacks around north-central Iraq left over 20 dead and over twice as many wounded on Monday. (Actually, it is worse; the average estimated dead in the guerrilla war ranges between 38 and 60 per day, but wire services seldom report more than a fraction of these deaths).

A Political Debate on Stress Disorder

By Shankar Vedantam, The Washington Post

As claims rise, VA takes stock.

The spiraling cost of post-traumatic stress disorder among war veterans has triggered a politically charged debate and ignited fears that the government is trying to limit expensive benefits for emotionally scarred troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

Scholar Stands by Post-9/11 Writings on Torture, Domestic Eavesdropping

By Peter Slevin, The Washington Post

Former justice official says he was interpreting law, not making policy

John Yoo knows the epithets of the libertarians, the liberals and the lefties. Widely considered the intellectual architect of the most dramatic assertion of White House power since the Nixon era, he has seen constitutional scholars skewer his reasoning and students call for his ouster from the University of California at Berkeley.

Iraq Vote Shows Sunnis Are Few in New Military

By Richard A. Oppel Jr., The New York Times

Baghdad, Iraq - An analysis of preliminary voting results released Monday from the Dec. 15 parliamentary election suggests that in contrast to the remarkable surge in Sunni Arab participation in the political process, the Sunnis still have comparatively little representation in the Iraqi security forces.

War Party or Peace Party?

By John MANNING, Portside

Dear Friends,

Both our country and Japan, the two most economically
dominant and militarily armed countries of the present
world, are approaching elections in which both peoples,

Called on Their Errors

By John Crewdson, The Chicago Tribune

CIA agents' use of cell phones during mission lets police in Italy identify them, spurring agency review.

Milan - The trick is known to just about every small-time crook in the cellular age: If you don't want police to know where you are, take the battery out of your cell phone when you're not using it.

John Nichols: Censuring Bush requires citizens' help

By John Nichols, Capital Times

As President Bush and his aides scramble to explain new revelations regarding Bush's authorization of spying on the international telephone calls and e-mails of Americans, the ranking Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee has begun a process that could lead to the censure, and perhaps the impeachment, of the president and vice president.

Post-vote violence escalates in Iraq

BAGHDAD—At least two dozen people and a U.S. soldier were killed yesterday in shootings and bombings mostly targeting the Shiite-dominated security services.

Officials blamed the surge in violence on insurgent efforts to deepen the political turmoil surrounding the contested Dec. 15 vote. Preliminary figures have given a big lead to the religious Shiite bloc that controls the current interim government.

NSA Spied on U.N. Diplomats in Push for Invasion of Iraq

By Norman Solomon

Despite all the news accounts and punditry since the New York Times
published its Dec. 16 bombshell about the National Security Agency's
domestic spying, the media coverage has made virtually no mention of

BUSHIES REFUSING TO DIAGNOSE RETURNING SOLDIERS WITH POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER

By Doug Ireland

The Bush administration is twisting itself into a pretzel trying to find ways not to diagnose soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), including altering the diagnostic criteria established by the American Psychiatric Association. READ THE REST

Chomsky on Iraq

On the Iraq Election, Noam Chomsky interviewed by Andy Clark
Radio Netherlands, December 18, 2005

Andy Clark: But what do you think would happen if the process now goes forward and the Iraqi government is formed and the new parliament turns around and passes a majority motion for the coalition-led troops to withdraw within six months? What do you think would happen?

What Did They Say When They Were Impeaching Clinton?

From the Impeach Bush Coalition:

Tom Delay (R-TX):
"This nation sits at a crossroads. One direction points to the higher road of the rule of law. Sometimes hard, sometimes unpleasant, this path relies on truth, justice and the rigorous application of the principle that no man is above the law. Now, the other road is the path of least resistance. This is where we start making exceptions to our laws based on poll numbers and spin control. This is when we pitch the law completely overboard when the mood fits us, when we ignore the facts in order to cover up the truth.

Fear Destroys What bin Laden Could Not

Published on Monday, December 26, 2005 by the Miami Herald
By Robert Steinback

One wonders if Osama bin Laden didn't win after all. He ruined the America that existed on 9/11. But he had help.

A Man Without a Country

By David Swanson

Kurt Vonnegut, at age 82, has published over two dozen books. His latest is called "A Man Without a Country." It's a book that is brutally honest in its hopelessness, in fact – I think – overly hopeless, and yet humorous. It may even be hopeless in order to better be humorous. Vonnegut discusses in the book the use of tragedy to heighten laughter. But certainly the humor works to lighten the load of dismay and despair that this book ever-so-lightly dumps on us.

IMPEACH: Retaking the Public Square

by Kagro X, www.dailykos.com

Have you heard the news? Daniel Schorr says "nobody's talking about impeachment." Charles Krauthammer says impeachment talk is "nonsense." And Jonah Goldberg says impeachment will actually help W's poll numbers.

White Phosphorous: The U.S. Used It; The U.S. Says It's Illegal

By David Swanson

The U.S. military used white phosphorous as a weapon in Fallujah, and the U.S. military says such use is illegal. That's one heck of a fog fact (Larry Beinhart's term for a fact that is neither secret nor known). This fact has appeared in an article in the Guardian (UK) and been circulated on the internet, but has just not interested the corporate media in the United States.

Analyzing the Evidence: CIA's WINPAC and Uranium from Africa

WMDgate: Fixing Intelligence Around Policy, Part 4A -- CIA's WINPAC and Uranium from Africa
http://www.theleftcoaster.com/archives/006336.php

On Bush: It's Time to Say 'Enough'

By Marty Luster, Ithaca Journal (New York)

As if the lies that took us to Iraq were not enough. As if the knowing use of bad intelligence wasn't enough. As if the ever- shifting justifications for this war were not enough. As if the use of torture by and at the behest of the United States was not enough. As if the disclosure of classified information to retaliate against a critic of the war policy was not enough. As if the shroud of secrecy that binds this administration was not enough. As if the squandering of hundreds of billions of dollars in support of this war at a time when we can't find the money to rebuild one of our great cities, when millions of us go without health care and when the federal government has reneged on its commitment to public education was not enough.

Speaking Events

David Swanson at St. Michael’s College, Colchester, VT, October 5, 2016.

David Swanson in Fairbanks, Alaska, October 22, 2016.

Find Events Here.

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